Wooden Jointer Planes

wooden jointer plane
Our Rating

           

Reviewed By: I.Ball

Manufacturer: Various

Tool Type: Wooden Planes

Plane Type: Jointer / Trying


           

The wooden jointer plane / wooden trying plane is the longest of all the wooden planes.

This long length allows the plane to carry out its function of flattening out long lengths of board.

Please see the wooden smoothing plane review for the core details of the old British wooden jointer plane as the core details are the same.

Wooden jointer planes were in the region of 18 inch to 28+ inch long fitted with plane iron's ranging from 2 1/4 inch to 2 5/8 inch wide depending on the width of the plane.

The wooden jointer planes nearly always have a closed rear handle opposed to an open rear handle which is generally seen on the wooden jack planes.

These planes due to their size are very weighty.



old wooden jointer plane

The wooden jointer plane was the forerunner to the infill jointer planes such as the Norris A1 plane and the iron jointer planes such as the Stanley plane number 8 and the Record plane number 07.

All three of these types of jointer planes (wooden jointer, infill jointer and iron jointer) were manufactured and sold by tool shops in competition with each other for a very lengthy period of about 70 years or so during the latter 1800's - 1950's.

History shows us the overall winner of the battle of the jointer planes was the iron jointer plane. Wooden jointer planes and infill jointer planes were more than capable jointer planes but ultimately they lost the prolonged battle for a foothold in the jointer plane market and as such production fell away to the point they were stopped being made by manufacturers.

Spin on to today and you will find wooden trying planes / jointer planes are seeing a bit of a niche resurgence, if you watch the video at the bottom you can see why.


marples wooden jointer plane

Old Wooden Jointer Plane Manufacturers

There have been many, many manufacturers of old wooden jointer planes, the following is a list of some of these makers:

Griffiths
Greenslade
Marples
Mathieson
Moseley
Nurse
Preston (Edward)
Steadman
..many others


marples wooden jointer plane

Finding More Information About Wooden Jointer Plane Manufacturers

The manufacturer's mark (if present) can virtually always be found on the front nose of the plane. If the plane is quite mucky or you hadn't realised, this is the place to look to identify who made it.

When looking for the maker mark it should be noted most old wooden planes have previous owners marks, these previous owner stamps can also be found stamped into the front nose including overstamping the maker mark.

The previous owner marks can cause confusion to the untrained eye resulting sometimes in incorrect cataloguing.


marples wooden jointer plane

Previous owner names quite ofter are stamped more than once on a plane (but not always) whereas a manufacturer mark is nearly always stamped just once.

If you wish to delve deeper there are a few books out there to help identify the age of the plane(s).

The authority of these books (at the time of writing this) has to be Jane Rees 'British Planemakers - 4th Edition'. The 'British Planemakers fom 1700 - Third Edition' is also good if you come across a secondhand copy.


Denmark Jack wooden jointer plane

This Denmark made plane is an initially slightly confusing Jack Jointer Plane?...













...Basically 'Jack' is the name of the manufacturer / brand and it is a jointer plane due to its length/size.



Manufactured Dates

<1700 - 1970>


The Trying / Jointer Plane In Use

YouTube video by 'Mortise & Tenon Magazine' with presenter talking about the Trying / Jointer Plane with the main focus being on the wooden Trying / Jointer Plane...





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Disclaimer

(i) This review/article may give warning(s) / advisory notes / cautions / guidelines given in good faith, any such information should not be solely relied upon and seen as the exhaustive list of warnings / advisory notes / cautions / guidelines. Refer to good safety practices for the safety of you and others. Refer to good practices for the good health of your tool and property.
(ii) The details here are given in good faith, the details are constantly growing and evolving including corrections, there is scope for error and shouldn't be fully relied upon, please confirm any details for yourself by performing additional research from reliable sources.




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